Shaka Zulu Is Assassinated (1828)

A skilled warrior, Shaka established himself as head of the Zulu circa 1816 and soon made them the dominant power in southeastern Africa. He was ruthless before his mother’s death in 1827, but after, he became positively savage. He had at least 7,000 people executed for being insufficiently grief-stricken, put to death any couple found to have conceived during the mourning period, and even slaughtered cows so that their calves would know the loss of a mother. Who ultimately assassinated Shaka? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Kiwanis Kids' Day

Kiwanis International first came up with the idea of setting aside a day to focus on children and their welfare in 1949. On the fourth Saturday in September, local Kiwanis clubs sponsor activities designed to show the community’s appreciation of and pride in its children. The program for the day varies from one club to the next, but some of the more popular activities include parades, picnics and field days, talent shows, and youth recognition banquets. The idea is to show youngsters that they are an important part of the community and that the community wants them to be good citizens. Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Anne of Austria, Queen of France (1601)

Neglected by her husband, French King Louis XIII, Anne of Austria stirred up controversy with flirtatious indiscretions. After her seemingly treasonous correspondence with Spain, her husband’s principal minister, Cardinal Richelieu, attempted to limit her influence. When Louis died, Anne was declared sole regent of their son, Louis XIV—contrary to her husband’s wishes—and strove to ensure his absolute power. What did she do that was hailed at the time as “a marvel when it was least expected”? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Jump Rope

Dating from the 19th century, jump rope is traditionally a sidewalk or playground game in which players hold a rope at each end and twirl it in a circle, while one or more players jump over it. There are many variations, including “double Dutch,” in which two ropes are twirled in opposite directions. Single-rope jumping is a popular workout, especially with boxers, to develop the lungs and improve footwork. Ten minutes of jumping rope is roughly equivalent to running a mile in how many minutes? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

The Brief Battle of Prestonpans (1745)

England’s King James II may have been deposed in the Glorious Revolution of 1688, but he was not without supporters. These supporters, the Jacobites, spent the next six decades unsuccessfully fighting to restore him—and, later, his descendants—to the throne. Their final major attempt, the Forty-five Rebellion, began auspiciously for the House of Stuart, with a victory at Prestonpans, Scotland. The battle was won in mere minutes. How many casualties did the government troops suffer in that time? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

John Loudon McAdam (1756)

McAdam was a Scottish engineer who invented a process called “macadamization.” After noting the poor condition of the highways near his estate, he recommended that roads be raised above the adjacent ground for good drainage and then covered, first with large stones then with small stones, and bound with fine gravel. It was perhaps the greatest advance in road construction since Roman times and became known as “tarmac,” short for “tarmacadam.” What was the first macadam road in North America? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

The Tetragrammaton

In the Old Testament, the proper name of God is revealed to Moses on Mount Sinai. Known as the Tetragrammaton—Greek for “four-letter word”—it consists of four Hebrew consonants: yod, he, vav, and he. These are variously transliterated as JHVH, JHWH, YHWH, or YHVH. Although contention still exists today, many scholars accept the pronunciation as either “Yahweh” Or “Jehovah.” The name is regarded by Jews as ineffable—too sacred to be pronounced. When reading, what substitute is used? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary