Monthly Archives: February 2020

The Family Circus Cartoon Debuts (1960)

When The Family Circus debuted in 1960, the characters were about the same age as artist Bil Keane and his family. In the more than 50 years of cartoons that followed, the characters did not age appreciably, but their real-life counterparts did—Jeff Keane, the basis for 3-year-old Jeffy, went on to ink the cartoon for his father. The most widely syndicated cartoon panel in the world, it has appeared in 1,500 newspapers. What was the original name of the cartoon, and why did it change? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Fiesta Day

Held for more than 50 years, Fiesta Day celebrates the multicultural heritage of those who settled Ybor City, which is part of Tampa, Florida. Cuban, African-Cuban, Italian, and Jewish immigrants made Ybor City their home in the 1880s, and their influence is still felt in Tampa’s Historic District, where this festival takes place. Celebrants can enjoy the diverse food, drink, music, and arts and crafts that reflect the character of Ybor City. Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

James "Jimmy" Dorsey (1904)

Dorsey was a prominent jazz musician and big band leader. He began performing as a youth, first learning the trumpet before taking up his signature instruments, the clarinet and alto saxophone. He formed several bands with his brother, and the duo became so popular that they later starred in a fictionalized film biography, The Fabulous Dorseys. After they parted ways in 1935, the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra had several number-one hits. What was the name of his first post-split hit record? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Vladimir Solovyov

Solovyov was a Russian writer who played a significant role in the development of Russian religious philosophy and poetry at the end of the 19th century. He believed that religious sects should, at the expense of individualism, pursue common ground and unity, and he was condemned for his “heretical” teachings about the entity Sophia, the incarnation of divine wisdom. Despite his intellectual achievements, he is said to have died a homeless pauper. What celebrated writer was his close friend? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Marzas

On the last night of February and the first of March in Spain, young marceros, or March serenaders, wander through the streets singing songs to their girlfriends and asking for donations of food and sweets to celebrate the arrival of spring. The term marzas refers both to the traditional songs they sing and to the gifts they receive. Although the songs themselves vary, they always mention the month of March and the coming of spring, leading many to believe that the tradition has its roots in pagan rituals celebrating the passing of winter. Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

The South Sea Bubble

The South Sea Bubble was one of the earliest modern financial crises. It involved the South Sea Company, which was established in 1711 by the lord treasurer of England and was expected to be extremely profitable. Touting exclusive trading rights with Spanish South America, it sparked wild speculation that rocketed its share price to £1,000 in August 1720. The following month, it collapsed. Thousands were ruined—including many members of the government. What was the company’s true purpose? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Ecuadoran Civicism & National Unity Day

Public displays of patriotism are commonplace for Ecuadorans on this national holiday, observed on the anniversary of the Battle of Tarqui in 1822. The flag of Ecuador is prominently featured during the day’s celebrations. Along with receiving a public display at government and private buildings, the flag also appears in the traditional ceremonies at schools throughout the country. Students with exemplary academic records will have the honor of being flag bearers in official parades, and all students are expected to deliver an oath and kiss the flag as a symbol of their allegiance. Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Argumentum ad Ignorantiam

Argument from ignorance is an informal logical fallacy that asserts that an argument is necessarily true because it has not been proven false or vice versa. Instead of providing evidence to support a claim, the argument simply demonstrates that others cannot provide evidence to the contrary. For example, to say that ghosts exist because no one has proven otherwise would be a case of argumentum ad ignorantiam. Usually trickery, this argument is used in what highly esteemed legal principle? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary