Category Archives: Article of the Day

Football Hooliganism

Soccer, or association football, as it known throughout most of the world, is the most popular international team sport, followed by vast, emotional audiences and associated at times with outbreaks of violence and mass hooliganism, notably by British supporters. Violence at football matches dates back centuries, with political, religious, and territorial rivalries often contributing to feuds between fans of opposing teams. What incident occurred during England’s bid to host the 2018 World Cup? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Sacraments

A sacrament is a religious symbol or rite that is believed to transfer spiritual power to the participant. Today, sacraments are primarily associated with Christianity, which holds that they consist of visible signs of invisible grace and derive from practices instituted by Jesus. Christian churches, however, are divided with regard to the number and operation of sacraments. In most Protestant churches, only baptism and communion are recognized. What are the 7 sacraments of Roman Catholicism? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Bowerbirds

Bowerbirds are several species of songbirds found in Australia and New Guinea. To attract female mates, males of the species build elaborate bowers on the ground, decorate them with bright, shiny objects, and then display and sing loudly above them. Females observe the courtship displays, inspect the quality of the bowers, and select a mate. After mating, the female builds a simple nest away from the bower in which to lay her eggs. What objects do bowerbirds often use to decorate their bowers? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Benjamin Britten

Considered the most significant British composer since Henry Purcell, Britten first won international acclaim in 1937 for his Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge for string orchestra. His operas, admired for their skillful setting of English words and their orchestral interludes, include The Rape of Lucretia, The Turn of the Screw, and Death in Venice. In 1976, he became the first British composer in history to be ennobled. What honor did he decline? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Disco

Disco is a style of dance music characterized by hypnotic rhythms, repetitive lyrics, and electronically produced sounds. It arose in the mid-1970s in New York City underground nightclubs where DJs played dance records for hours without interruption. With considerable input from producers, artists such as Donna Summer, the Bee Gees, and Diana Ross developed the disco sound and had many hits. Disco peaked with the release of the film Saturday Night Fever and “died” soon after on what date? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

The Atharvaveda

The oldest scriptures of Hinduism and the most ancient religious texts in an Indo-European language, the Veda consists of four types of literature. Most important are the four Samhitas, which are the basic Vedas. The fourth Samhita, the Atharvaveda, was written at a later period and included in the canon only after a long struggle. Influenced by popular religion, it included spells and incantations for the practice of magic. What some of the purposes of the spells? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

The Lambton Worm

One of northeast England’s most famous fairy tales, the story of the Lambton Worm opens with a youth named John Lambton skipping church to go fishing, whereupon he catches a strange eel-like creature and drops it down a well. Lambton eventually goes on to join the Crusades and returns years later to find that the worm has become a giant beast. A witch tells him how to defeat the creature but warns him that he must kill the first living thing he sees after he does so. How does the story end? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Follies

In architecture, a folly is an eccentric, generally nonfunctional and often deliberately unfinished structure erected to enhance a romantic landscape. Follies were particularly popular in England in the 18th and early 19th centuries. They resemble medieval towers, ruined castles overgrown with vines, or crumbling classical temples complete with fallen, eroded columns. In the US, the term has been applied to ornate gazebos. How did the Irish Potato Famine lead to the building of several follies? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

The Farnese Palace

One of the most magnificent palaces of Rome, the Palazzo Farnese, or Farnese Palace, was designed by Antonio da Sangallo for Cardinal Alessandro Farnese, who later became Pope Paul III. Built of huge stone blocks plundered from ancient monuments, it was begun before 1514 and, after the architect’s death, was continued by Michelangelo and completed by Giacomo della Porta. After the Farnese family died out, the king of Naples gained possession of the palace. What has it housed since 1874? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Giordano Bruno

Bruno was a 16th-century Italian philosopher who theorized that the universe is infinite. He entered a Dominican convent as a teen but abandoned the order after being accused of heresy and began traveling Europe lecturing and teaching. His cosmological theories anticipated modern conceptions of the universe but led to his excommunication by the Roman Catholic, Calvinist, and Lutheran churches. Arrested by the Inquisition in 1593, he was burned at the stake after a trial lasting how many years? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary