Category Archives: Today’s Holiday

Old Fiddler's Convention

A five-day concert in the small town of Galax, Virginia, the Old Fiddler’s Convention spotlights old-time music in an outdoor setting. The convention was organized in 1935 as a fundraising event by members of Moose Lodge No. 733 and was dedicated to “keeping alive the memories and sentiments of days gone by.” About 25,000 people now attend. Hundreds of contestants take part, competing for cash prizes and trophies in categories that include guitar, mandolin, dulcimer, dobro, clawhammer and bluegrass banjo, clog or flatfoot dancing, and folk singing. Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

British Columbia Day

British Columbia, Canada’s westernmost province, joins several other communities in holding a civil holiday on the first Monday in August. For local residents, this day honors the pioneers who established the colony of British Columbia in the 19th century. There are a number of events that take place in the province’s capital, Victoria, but the most popular is the “Symphony Splash,” an annual performance of modern and classical music by the Victoria Symphony Orchestra. Held on a barge on the city’s Inner Harbor, the concert draws thousands of tourists and locals. Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Billy the Kid Pageant

It was in Lincoln, New Mexico, that the legendary American outlaw Billy the Kid was brought to be hanged in 1881. He made his escape from the courthouse, which today has been restored as a state museum. The reenactment that takes place every year involves almost everyone in town and is designed to be as historically accurate as possible. Festival activities surround Billy the Kid’s “last escape” throughout the weekend to give the town a late 19th-century feeling, such as weaving and horseshoeing demonstrations, encampments, and an appearance by the Fourth Texas Cavalry. Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Emancipation Day (Hutchinson, Kansas)

Emancipation Day typically commemorates the day African-American slaves were freed in the United States. That event is celebrated annually in Hutchinson, Kansas, on the first weekend in August. The weekend typically kicks off with a social event on Friday night and features a parade on Saturday morning. Following the parade and opening ceremonies, participants gather for a picnic in the park with food and drink vendors. Entertainment includes concerts featuring jazz, blues, or Gospel performers, and the weekend concludes with an ice cream social on Sunday afternoon. Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Festival Interceltique

Created in 1971, the Festival Interceltique (Interceltic Festival) brings together traditional and contemporary expressions of Celtic culture and arts. Approximately 4,500 singers, instrumentalists, visual artists, dancers, professors, and filmmakers from the traditionally Celtic lands take part in the event, including Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Cornwall, Galicia (Spain), Asturias (Spain), and Brittany (France). The festival takes place in Lorient, a town in Brittany, from the first Friday in August and until the second Sunday of August. About 350,000 spectators attend the festival annually. Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Ilinden (Macedonia Republic Day)

August 2 is an official holiday in Macedonia commemorating the nation’s first modern statehood. In 1903, Macedonian Christian nationalists led a rebellion against the Turkish Ottoman Empire. The rebels staged an uprising on August 2 of that year, a date that also marked the Christian feast day of Ilinden, or the prophet Elijah‘s ascension into heaven. The Ilinden uprising has become a cultural cornerstone in the mythology of modern Macedonia and is acknowledged as an important precursor to the establishment of the present-day Republic of Macedonia. Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Lammas

Possibly one of the four great pagan festivals of Britain, Lammas was known as the Gule of August in the Middle Ages. In medieval England, loaves made from the first ripe grain were blessed in the church on this day—the word lammas being a short form of “loaf mass.” Lammas Day is similar in original intent to the Jewish Feast of Weeks, also called Shavuot or Pentecost, which came at the end of the Passover grain harvest. A 15th-century suggestion was that the name derived from “lamb” and “mass,” and was the time when a feudal tribute of lambs was paid. Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Merengue Festival

The merengue is a lively Caribbean dance that originated in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. The world’s most famous merengue festival takes place in Santo Domingo, the Dominican Republic’s capital city, where outdoor stages are set up along the city’s waterfront, and top bands play merengue music while couples swirl and shake to the fast-paced, pulsating rhythms. In addition to watching the performances and competitions among merengue dancers, festivalgoers can enjoy the music of DJs and bands on the street, imbibe rum and beer, and eat the signature pork sandwiches, chimichurris. Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Chief Joseph Days

Chief Joseph (1840-1904) was the chief of the Nez Perce Indians. He spent his life in exile and pleaded with President Theodore Roosevelt to let his people return to their ancestral home, and is honored with a four-day festival every July in Joseph, Oregon. Established in 1945, the festival features one of the largest rodeos in the Northwest, a traditional Indian dance contest, a Nez Perce encampment and powwow, parades, dances, a golf tournament, and a cowboy church service. Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary