The Knight

In medieval Europe, incessant private warfare brought about a permanent military class, and the institution of knighthood was well established by the 10th century. After 1100, military tenure was generally subject to the law of primogeniture, which resulted in a class of landless knights, who formed the great military orders of knighthood at the time of the Crusades, including the Knights Templars and the Knights Hospitalers. In modern Britain, women who are knighted are addressed as what? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Day of the Colombian Woman (1967)

Not much is definitively known about Policarpa Salavarrieta’s early years. Even her name is subject to conjecture. What is undisputed—and secured her a place in the annals of Colombian history and, in 1967, a day commemorating her heroism—is that she sacrificed her life trying to secure Colombia’s independence; she was executed on November 14, 1817, for her activities on behalf of the revolution. Aside from the day of remembrance, what other honors has the Colombian government accorded her? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Sir Frederick Grant Banting (1891)

Banting was a Canadian physician who, with Scottish physiologist John Macleod, won a 1923 Nobel Prize for the discovery of the hormone insulin. Banting and his assistant Charles Best experimented on diabetic dogs, demonstrating that insulin lowered their blood sugar. Insulin was proven effective on humans within months of the first experiments with dogs. In acknowledgment of Best’s work, Banting gave him a share of his portion of the Nobel Prize. What tragic accident took Banting’s life in 1941? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Reduplicative Paramnesia

Reduplicative paramnesia is a condition in which one believes that a place has been duplicated and exists simultaneously in more than one location or that it has been relocated to another site. It is one of the delusional misidentification syndromes, which involve a belief that the identity of a person, object, or place has somehow changed. Highly rare, it is most often observed in brain injury patients who are otherwise logically sound. When was it first observed? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary

Daredevil Sam Patch's Final, Fatal Stunt (1829)

Patch, a one-time mill worker, made a name for himself as a stunt diver in the late 1920s, most famously by leaping from a 125-ft (38-m) ladder into the Niagara River near the base of Niagara Falls not once but twice. Less than a month later, he made another 125-ft jump, ironically billed as “Sam’s Last Jump,” this time into the Genesee River. With thousands watching, the daredevil leapt to his death. In his first Genesee stunt the week before, what did Patch send over the ledge before jumping? Discuss

Source: The Free Dictionary